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The Two Types Of Muscle Growth…

By Alex On May 14, 2010 Under Sports Training

Imagine if you’re an athlete that’s just been focusing on sarcoplasmic hypertrophy all this time…hopefully you’re NOT one of them!

Let me know your thoughts below on the video above, I always dig seeing what you have to say (also, at least 25 comments and I’ll crank out another cool video for you this weekend…please do this, I have way too much fun making these videos!).

And if you have any specific questions, let me know below too, and I’ll do my best to get them answered for you.

Also, here’s the link to Jason’s new program: Triple Threat Muscle

But like I said, DON’T get it yet…I worked my Maroko Magic and got him to drop the price just for you guys next week, but don’t worry about that for now, I’m gonna try and get a couple more good videos up for you this week and weekend before then.

Talk to you in the Comments Section,

Alex

25 comments - add yours
LeAnn

May 14, 2010

Great information. Thanks for the vid. I’ll watch for your special next week.

james

May 14, 2010

I don’t see the video anywhere, not sure if its me or if the video wasn’t embedded properly

Alex

May 14, 2010

James-
If you’re still having issues, let me know, I’ll see what I can do for you.

Also, this was filmed at 3 AM in the morning and naturally, the brain doesn’t work quite as well when it’s used to sleeping! So, I want to re-emphasize to everyone that these are guidelines more than rules, and you should be working in a wide range of rep-ranges; not just in one.

For a lower-body workout, you might do 5 sets of 3 reps of front squats, then 4 sets of 6 reps of hamstring curls and then finish it off with 3 sets of 12 reps of dumbell step-ups…and that would accomplish a lot. Make sense?

Alex

Jeremy

May 14, 2010

Awesome video Alex, thanks for this!

John

May 14, 2010

Can you give some tips on getting sarcometric using bodyweight exercises?

Thanks.

Jim

May 14, 2010

Very cool. I was wondering, would doing explosive movements in that 3-8 rep (like Olympic lifts) train the contractile proteins for quicker response time as well?

Thanks

Alex

May 14, 2010

John – Like I said in the video, sarcomeric hypertrophy has a lot do with the amount of muscular tension that you can produce in the exercise. And as we know, creating lots of tension in bodyweight exercises can be tougher because the load (your body) isn’t that heavy. BUT, using just your bodyweight, you can create “sarcomeric worthy” adaptations in really powerful eccentric contractions, so anything that creates a lot of rapid, eccentric contractions will work. Things like depth jumps (for upper body too) and other forms of “bodyweight plyometric” moves will work for you here.

Another BUT though (funny, I’m not even an “ass man”), time under tension has a lot do with hypertrophy too and the amount of time under tension in normal plyometrics isn’t really long enough to induce serious hypertrophy (unless you did a million depth jumps). I wouldn’t get too caught up with it though, lots of people have built big muscles using just their bodyweight.

Jim – Like I said above, total time under tension is important too for muscle growth and the nature of Olympic lifts require that time under tension is as short as possible.

If you’re focusing on increasing muscle size, try using Olympic Lifts at the start of the workout as a potentiation method (to really stimulate those fast-twitch fibers) and then follow that with a few exercises in the 3-8 rep range for hypertrophy.

-Alex

Patrick Cummings

May 14, 2010

I don’t see the video either. The only video on the page is your welcome video.

Jimmy

May 14, 2010

Alex, I don’t know what else to say. You are a great trainer. End of story.

Mohammed Akif

May 14, 2010

To those that can’t see the video and are using Firefox, try Internet Explorer. Worked for me.

nursing schools

May 14, 2010

this post is very usefull thx!

Bullhusky

May 15, 2010

Great video explaining the “Arnold” pump and building lasting muscle.

Zen

May 15, 2010

Awesome video. You’re the man Alex!

Doug

May 16, 2010

Hey Alex, My daughter has been lifting at our work out room downstairs for 18 months. That means she started when she was almost exactly 10, she is now 11.5 years old. (I coach her premier soccer team. We are small city and are now ranked #10 in WI)

We began with very light weights 5 lbs., probably 20 reps, then 8 lbs., then 10 lbs. and now a couple of he lifts she does with 15 lbs. Everything is around 15 reps. (Free weights/pull down machine/leg ext/flex.) Why? I thought most weight trainers would frown against a kid 10 – 11 lifting, and certainly against a kid w/undeveloped bone/muscle lifting sarcoplasmic ie: 3-8 reps. BUT, a type of toning, w/muscle development, w/obvious strength increase was the goal, and we are really obtaining that.

Sports: Tennis (very high level-hits daily) Soccer – (high level-daily) Lifting workout takes place early morning and gets completed in 10 – 12 minutes. The kid then continues w/a pretty complete agility workout (ladder/w’s/rope, etc) After school plays her sports.

The question: At what age can we SAFELY introduce 3-8 rep lifts routine with certain muscle groups? (The kid is average to slightly above average height/wt. for her age. SPEED is an issue. Speed is good when compared to kids 11 years old – but not blazing when compared to 12’s on soccer team (she plays with 1 year older kids) where we tested 30 days ago 40’s. 12 Kids total, 5 at 5.5 – 5.6, 3 at 5.7 – 5.9, 2 at 6.0 – 6.1 (MY KID), 3 at 6.2 -6.3. We do religiously do most quick feet drills we have seen posted and have gone to speed camp to learn others speed techniques, pawing/peg leg/back peddle/bicycle, giant leg swings)

Ekam

May 16, 2010

i dont see a video anywhere too

Jordan

May 17, 2010

Hi Alex, I want to say and ask alot but the best way to say this is, is i want to be an athlete like Andre Iguodala. I want to be super athletic and explosive while being BIG (muscle mass) and being Very Ripped (cut muscle)… How can you compare Andre Iguodala to this video, what do you think he has done out of the two S’s to get the way he is..

Thanks,

Jordan Myers
P.S. And as you can see he is my favourite athlete.

dillon

May 17, 2010

great info thx. do u suggest pyramid lifting?

Daniel Brady

May 22, 2010

Heya Alex, i am english and 16 so i am just i the middle of my GCSE exams. Next week (when i have a half term break) i am starting my work out routine based on things from jasons jump manual, tehniques i have got from you and all the links youhave sent me. Im a vrey skiny athlete and i am lookng to get faster an jump higher and be a more powerfull sportsman in my sports (basketballand martial arts) so i will foucus mainly on my legs with both wieghts and plyos and upper body im lookin to put on a bit of muscle wieght ( am 6ft and only 10 stne so im very undewieghteven ough i et pretty much non stop!!) Are there any tips on foods i should eat before and after work outs (allthough i am not allowed protien shakes, my mum is convince i will turn into a body bilder for some reason)or small work out tips i could encorpeate. But i loved the vidio and it has given me some great advice, so cheers for that and is there any advice you can giv me a a person who isj ust startig to work out (i am already farly fit i run 100m in 13 seconds and 12 miles in 1 and a half hours) cheers dan brady
ps i know its a big comment but cheers for any aditional help you could give me

William

May 22, 2010

Very nice video Alex. Good to see people promoting other types of training rather than the usual 3×8 or 3×10 brigade.

Ekam

May 22, 2010

wsup alex…i dont see a video anywhere man, can u help me out alittle
thanks

Ekam

May 22, 2010

o wait, now i see it, thanks mohammed

Ekam

May 22, 2010

great video man, love your sense of humour

Taylor

May 23, 2010

Alex how can I see these videos you are posting? They never show up anywhere for me? I can never see them and its frustrating because I really want the info!~! All I can see is the little into note you leave to these videos and then sometimes a link that is not to the video but usually another site which has additional info that is related to the video…I can never actually find the video!!! HELP!!!

Ian

May 24, 2010

Great video lots of great information that many athletes out there have no clue about

trent kozman

July 24, 2010

another awesome video!!! okay, i currently lift in the following manner…
i start the workout with my explosive lift (ie. bench press, shoulder press, deadlift, squat) and then progress to smaller more auxiliary lifts (db rows, db bench, pull ups, etc). the aux. lifts are usually in the 6-12 rep range while the explosive lifts are in the 3-5 range. i also break it up into splits…(as follows)
day 1-chest, biceps
day 2-legs (squats, heavy leg day) and plyos
day 3-shoulders, triceps
day 4-plyos
day 5-back
day 6-legs (heavy) and plyos
day 7-rest
thanks for your input on this:)
again, GREAT VIDEO!!!!!